Basketball dribbling drills for coaches part 3

Basketball dribbling drills for coaches part 3

This drill will be focusing on dribbling for coaches. This post will be the third one out of a series I am starting which is to do with dribbling. As a coach you should be able to change some of these drills so that it can better suit your student, cater their skill level for example or age. As of right now just enjoy this post and make sure to soak in all the information that is presented in here.

Youth & Intermediate Dribbling Drills

 

 

Youth Ball Handling Drills – The Maravich Series

This is a great stationary ball handling series that improves your feel for the ball while improving…

  • Hand-Eye Coordination
  • Hand Quickness
  • Rhythm
  • Hand, Wrist, and Finger Strength

With youth players, we’ll spend about 3 to 5 minutes with this at every practice until we build a solid foundation.

Check out the video below…

 

 

Here is a list of the progressions mentioned in the video with approximate times:

0:25 – Ball Slaps
0:43 – Finger Tips
1:00 – Ball Circles
1:26 – Ball Wraps – One Leg
1:42 – Figure 8 – No Dribble
1:57 – Front To Back Toss
2:11 – One Leg Dribble
2:29 – Figure 8 Dribble
2:52 – Figure 8 Dribble – 1 Hand
3:09 – Spider Dribble

Emphasis Tips:

  • Use Finger Tips and Finger Pads / Keep Ball Off Your Palm – This helps with control of the basketball. Palming the ball makes it more difficult to control the ball.
  • Athletic Stance – Emphasize that your players execute
    these ball handling drills from a stance that they can play the game
    from. Watch for excessive leaning over and unbalanced positions.

In addition to this, make sure to spend time dribbling on the move.
You’ll also find as the players advance, that you can progress to more
advanced drills and spend less time on stationary ball handling.

 

Dribbling Drills on the Move

 

 

 

11 Drill Progressions to Improve Ballhandling

and
Dribbling Moves

General Instructions

Players will execute a dribble move each time they reach the chair.
Set up a chair 15 feet away from you. Dribble at the chair with the
designated hand. When you get to the chair, execute the prescribed
dribble move. Turn around and repeat.

Keep your eyes up (look forward) on all the dribbling moves.

8 Repetitions for Each Drill

We suggest 8 repetitions for each drill. So there will be a total of
88 repetitions (8 reps X 11 drills), which will take around 10-15
minutes. If desired, you can increase the number of reps for more
conditioning and bigger challenge. Or reduce reps to save time.

 

 

Note for Coaches: Using in Your Practices

 

If you want to use this drill in your team practice, line chairs or cones up in the middle of the court
and have everyone run the drill at the same time. Practice each
move/drill for 20-40 seconds. This is a very efficient way to work on
ballhandling (because everyone has a ball in their hands). And it’s a
great conditioner!

 

Drill #1 – Retreat Dribble with Cross Over

 

– Use a hockey stop and protect the ball before you retreat dribble.
– Explode backwards when you retreat (cover distance so you create plenty of space from defender)

Drill #2 – Cross Over (Right To Left)

– Keep the ball low on your cross over.
– Change speeds on the cross over move (from slow/medium to fast)
– Accelerate when you change direction. You want a quick change of direction and an explosive first step.

Drill #3 – Cross Over (Left To Right)

– Keep the ball low on your cross over.
– Change speeds on the cross over move (from slow/medium to fast)
– Accelerate when you change direction. You want a quick change of direction and an explosive first step.

Drill #4 – Cross Over / Through Legs (Right)

– Keep the ball low on your cross over.
– Change speeds on the cross over move (from slow/medium to fast)
– Snap the ball. Sell the fake.

Drill #5 – Cross Over / Through Legs (Left)

– Keep the ball low on your cross over.
– Change speeds on the cross over move (from slow/medium to fast)
– Snap the ball. Sell the fake.

Drill #6 – Cross Over / Behind Back (Right)

– Keep the ball low on your cross over.
– Change speeds on your dribble move (from slow/medium to fast)
– Snap the ball. Sell the fake.

Drill #7 – Cross Over / Behind Back (Left)

– Keep the ball low on your cross over.
– Change speeds on your dribble move (from slow/medium to fast)
– Snap the ball. Sell the fake.

Drill #8 – Cross Over / Through Legs / Behind Back

– Keep the ball low on your cross over.
– Change speeds on your dribble move (from slow/medium to fast)
– Snap the ball – improve your hand speed.

Drill #9 – Cross Over / Behind Back / Through Legs

– Keep the ball low on your cross over.
– Change speeds on your dribble move (from slow/medium to fast)
– Snap the ball – improve your hand speed.

Drill #10 – Cross Over / Through Legs / Through Legs

– Keep the ball low on your cross over.
– Change speeds on your dribble move (from slow/medium to fast)
– Snap the ball – improve your hand speed

Drill #11 – Cross Over / Cross Over / Through Legs

– Keep the ball low on your cross over.
– Change speeds on your dribble move (from slow/medium to fast)
– Snap the ball – improve your hand speed.

 

Gears – Change of Speed Dribbling

This is a great skill development drill
that improves dribbling ability and teaches “change of pace”. Being
able to change your pace/speed in a game is very important — it keeps
the defense off balance and all the great ballhandlers change their
speed very well. Its important that  you learn this because during a real game you will be twisting and turning and changing pace, this means it will give you and edge against your opposing team.

Instructions

  • Players line of up on the
    baseline. Each player needs two basketballs. Explain to the players
    how “gears” work. When they hear you say “gear 1”, they run 25% speed
    (a fast walk). Gear 2 is 50%, Gear 3 is 75%, and Gear 4 is 100% speed.
  • The
    drill starts when you say “gear 2” (you can call out what ever number
    you want). As players dribble down the court with two basketballs,
    keeping their head up, you holler out gear changes (gear 1, gear 2,
    etc). You might only have 1 gear change down the court and you could
    have 5 gear changes. You want to mix things up and get players used to
    changing to and from any speed. It’s a challenging drill that players
    both love and hate. They love it because it makes them better, but they
    hate it because it’s challenging and hard work.
  • Be sure to change from gear 4 to gear 1 often. You can also add more gears if you want.

 

Basketball Dribbling Drills – Speed Ladder Dribbling

The following ladder dribbling drills are great for warming up and
they are a fun way to develop your feel for the basketball. These drills
force you to control your dribble as you go through the ladder.

One Dribble Crossover

Take one dribble outside the ladder and crossover in the
square and move up through the ladder. Once you develop a
rhythm, start to pick up your pace.

 

Wide Crossover

Similar to continuous crossover, only this time you
exaggerate the dribble and extend the ball wide as you
dribble back and forth.

 

Inside Out Crossover

Inside out dribble outside the ladder and crossover inside the ladder.

Behind the Back Dribble

Keep the ball behind your back the entire time and dribble in each square as you progress down the ladder.

Two Ball – Lateral With Two Bounces

Begin by standing on one side of the ladder, facing the
center. Bounce each ball twice in each square as you move
down the ladder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two Ball – Lateral With One Bounce

Similar to the two ball lateral with two bounce drill, only this time you will only bounce the ball once in each square.

 

Two Ball – Side to Side

You will dribble two balls in unison, alternating one ball in the ladder and one ball outside the ladder.

 

Drill Tips

Execute – Then get outside your comfort zone – First work on the
execution of the drill. Once you start to feel comfortable, take it to
the next level and push yourself by increasing the speed.

Pick three to four variations of these drills to begin your workout.

Don’t overuse the drill – You should only spend three to five
minutes working on these ladder drills then you should move on to other
game-like ball handling drills.

One of the best warm up drills that you can do – Improves dribbling

Instructions For The Drill:

1 – You dribble through the cones using any sort of dribble
combinations. The cones are between your legs as you go through them.

Each dribble combination should land between each cone. Your goal is not to hit the cone.

Here are the dribble combinations in the video.

  • Single crossover
  • Double crossover
  • Triple crossover
  • Between the legs
  • Side to side
  • Side to side – Crossover

As Don says, the only limit is your imagination.

2 – After the last cone, you extend a dribble to the basket and shoot the ball. You can mix up finishing moves and jump shots.

Variations And Drill Adjustments

  • Add more cones – To work on more dribbling, you can add more cones and extend to half court.
  • Change distance between cones – To make things easier, you can
    lengthen the distance between each cone. To make things more difficult,
    you can shorten the distance between each cone.
  • Adjust the distance of the closest cone to the basket. If
    you’re a beginner, you can also have the last cone a little closer to
    the basket to shorten the distance to the goal.

Drill Tips:

  • Drop your hips and chest up.

    When you’re dribbling through the drill, you want to drop your hips and
    keep your chest up. You want to practice playing from a low position.

  • Quick changes – get outside your comfort zone.

    In order to improve your dribbling and hand speed, you need to push
    yourself. Once you’ve developed a rhythm, ramp it up. Go so fast that
    you make mistakes. That is the only way to improve and get beyond your
    current skill level.

  • Straight lines.

    When you take your one dribble to the hoop, you want to move in a
    straight line to the basket. As Don says, the shortest distance between
    two points is a straight line. So by moving in a straight line, it
    makes you quicker. By being quicker, you can more easily get by the
    defender.

    Also, by moving in a straight line, you’re more likely to get the
    defender on your backside which is very difficult to defend from.

 

More Little Things That Make This A Great Warm Up Drill!

Obviously, as mentioned before, this is great for improving your dribbling, footwork, finishing, and shooting while warming up.

However, there are some things that aren’t as obvious on why it’s a great warm up drill.

Wakes up your nervous system, makes you more alert and ready to react quickly, and prevents injuries.

The quick dribbling and also the quick chopping of your feet through
the cones does a few things for you. It excites and wakes up your
nervous system. This makes you more alert. It prepares you to react
quickly.

The chopping of your feet is also an extremely effective way to warm up and get all of the muscles firing in your legs.

Also, the short, quick movements make you less likely to get injured
when compared to going straight into a drill where you’re sprinting,
cutting, and jumping at game speed.

And due to the shortened distance between the cones and the goal, it
prevents you from reaching full speed. That way, you can’t accidentally
go too fast too soon.

Then when you practice your finishing and shooting, you’re preparing
for jumping that occurs during play with jumps off one leg and two legs.

After doing this drill for a couple of minutes, you’re ready for more aggressive sprints, cuts, and jumping.

Teaches you how to play low. And it is also great for improving first step speed!

Additionally, it’s great for improving your first step speed and explosiveness!

Think about what happens when you reach the last cone and you’re ready to take that dribble to attack the hoop.

You’re in a low squat position, probably lower than you normally
play. From this low position, it’s easier to stop and change
directions. And this helps you get lower on your first step when
exploding towards the hoop.

This is what a lot of pros practice to improve stride length, muscle
strength and power, and mobility. It also improves your balance so you
can remain strong and stable with the defender pushing on you. That
way, they don’t knock you off your straight line.

It trains you how to get to a lower position so it naturally happens during the game.

Watch this slow motion video of Steph Curry. He does everything described above.

He squats really low on the change of direction. He maintains that
low position when accelerating into the first step. He even drops his
shoulders and gets his “nose over his toes.” Then he gradually rises up
as he approaches the basket.

In summary I hope you have enjoyed this drill and make sure to stay tuned for more informative drills drom this series. If you have any questions feel free to ask them in the comment section below, I will happily answer them. Also, if you have any things that you think should be added to this post i will try my best to improve on it;)

 

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