Basketball Team Shooting Drills for Coaches part 2

Basketball Team Shooting Drills for Coaches part 2

This drill will be focusing on Team Shooting Drills for coaches. This post will be the second one out of a series I started . As a coach you should be able to change some of these drills so that it can better suit your student, cater their skill level for example or age. As of right now just enjoy this post and make sure to soak in all the information that is presented in here.

Form Shooting Drills

Form Shooting Drill

Instructions

First of all, it’s important to understand that this is drill requires you and all your players to pay very close attention to the details. It also requires a lot of repetitions. This is all about developing perfect shooting form, so once you get in a game you use the proper form without even thinking about it.

Note: For the first time around, you’ll need to demonstrate proper technique to all your players.

  1. Each player needs to grab a basketball and find a basket. It works best to have three players (or less) at each basket. Two players on each side of the basket and one in front.
  2. Each player should stand about 2 feet from the basket. (Yes, it’s only two feet. Do not stand farther back!)
  3. For right handed shooters, your right foot should be centered with the basket and pointing directly towards the middle of the basket.
  4. Your left foot should be positioned shoulder width apart in a comfortable position. Most players leave their left foot slightly behind the other foot. The left foot should be pointing in the relative area of the basket but probably should not be pointing directly at it. Most players feel the most comfortable with their left foot pointing just to the left of the basket.
  5. Bend your knees, at a comfortable angle somewhere around 45 degrees.
  6. Now if you’re feet are aligned properly, the rest of your body should follow suit.
  7. Hold the ball in your hand, palm facing up. Your non-shooting hand can dangle to the side.
  8. Slowly bring the ball in and hold is as if you were shooting with one hand.
  9. Your arm should form a 90 degree angle.
  10. Your tricep should be parallel with the floor and directly above your right leg.
  11. Your wrist should be bent with fingers spread out. The ball should be sitting on your finger pads, NOT your finger tips.
  12. Your index finger should be in the center of the ball.
  13. Pause. This is when you make sure your arm, feet, and everything is in the correct form.
  14. Look at the front of the rim.
  15. Proceed to shoot with one hand, leaving your off hand to the side. The player should use his legs on every shot. At the end of the shot, the player should be up on his toes. This is very important, because players generate most of their strength from their legs to shoot the ball to the basket.
  16. Hold your follow through. Tell your players, “It’s like reaching into a cookie jar.”
  17. Grab the ball and repeat the process.
  18. Get the ball quickly but don’t hurry your shot! Take your time.
  19. Each player should get a minimum of 20 repetitions, but 50 or 100 would be better.
Form shooting1 (8K)

Progression

As players master this skill, you can progress to other variations:

  1. Use two hands instead of one. Just make sure the off hand is one the side of the ball and not used to propel the ball.
  2. Do a jump shot. You should still stay two feet from the basket.
  3. Flip the ball to yourself, pivot, and shoot a jump shot. Again, stay close to the basket and make sure you proper form, even though you are going slightly faster. Do not sacrifice form!

For more advanced players, we commonly start with one-hand form shooting and progress all the way to pivots. We generally spend a few minutes on each progression and check all the players to make sure their form is not slipping.

Points of Emphasis

Continually tell your players…

  • Hold your follow through.
  • Take your time and always make sure your form is perfect.
  • Bend your knees.
  • Don’t stand back too far! Stay just a couple feet from the basket.

Motivation / Teaching Tips

Tip #1 – Tell you players, “Once you get good at it, don’t think you can stop. There are NBA players that do form shooting everyday!”

Tip #2 – Assign a coach to each basket to make sure they are using proper form. Help them correct any problems. If they don’t do it properly, this drill is a waste of time.

Tip #3 – Make sure your players do NOT dip one shoulder or lean too far forward. When shooting, you want your players to have an erect torso. I like to use the phrase “shoot tall.”

Tip #4 – If you as a coach, don’t know all the aspects of proper shooting form, consider picking up a good shooting video. We covered the basics above but there are more things to look for, like hand placement on the ball and so on.Instructions

First of all, it’s important to understand that this is drill requires you and all your players to pay very close attention to the details. It also requires a lot of repetitions. This is all about developing perfect shooting form, so once you get in a game you use the proper form without even thinking about it.

Note: For the first time around, you’ll need to demonstrate proper technique to all your players.

  1. Each player needs to grab a basketball and find a basket. It works best to have three players (or less) at each basket. Two players on each side of the basket and one in front.
  2. Each player should stand about 2 feet from the basket. (Yes, it’s only two feet. Do not stand farther back!)
  3. For right handed shooters, your right foot should be centered with the basket and pointing directly towards the middle of the basket.
  4. Your left foot should be positioned shoulder width apart in a comfortable position. Most players leave their left foot slightly behind the other foot. The left foot should be pointing in the relative area of the basket but probably should not be pointing directly at it. Most players feel the most comfortable with their left foot pointing just to the left of the basket.
  5. Bend your knees, at a comfortable angle somewhere around 45 degrees.
  6. Now if you’re feet are aligned properly, the rest of your body should follow suit.
  7. Hold the ball in your hand, palm facing up. Your non-shooting hand can dangle to the side.
  8. Slowly bring the ball in and hold is as if you were shooting with one hand.
  9. Your arm should form a 90 degree angle.
  10. Your tricep should be parallel with the floor and directly above your right leg.
  11. Your wrist should be bent with fingers spread out. The ball should be sitting on your finger pads, NOT your finger tips.
  12. Your index finger should be in the center of the ball.
  13. Pause. This is when you make sure your arm, feet, and everything is in the correct form.
  14. Look at the front of the rim.
  15. Proceed to shoot with one hand, leaving your off hand to the side. The player should use his legs on every shot. At the end of the shot, the player should be up on his toes. This is very important, because players generate most of their strength from their legs to shoot the ball to the basket.
  16. Hold your follow through. Tell your players, “It’s like reaching into a cookie jar.”
  17. Grab the ball and repeat the process.
  18. Get the ball quickly but don’t hurry your shot! Take your time.
  19. Each player should get a minimum of 20 repetitions, but 50 or 100 would be better.
Form shooting1 (8K)

Progression

As players master this skill, you can progress to other variations:

  1. Use two hands instead of one. Just make sure the off hand is one the side of the ball and not used to propel the ball.
  2. Do a jump shot. You should still stay two feet from the basket.
  3. Flip the ball to yourself, pivot, and shoot a jump shot. Again, stay close to the basket and make sure you proper form, even though you are going slightly faster. Do not sacrifice form!

For more advanced players, we commonly start with one-hand form shooting and progress all the way to pivots. We generally spend a few minutes on each progression and check all the players to make sure their form is not slipping.

Points of Emphasis

Continually tell your players…

  • Hold your follow through.
  • Take your time and always make sure your form is perfect.
  • Bend your knees.
  • Don’t stand back too far! Stay just a couple feet from the basket.

Motivation / Teaching Tips

Tip #1 – Tell you players, “Once you get good at it, don’t think you can stop. There are NBA players that do form shooting everyday!”

Tip #2 – Assign a coach to each basket to make sure they are using proper form. Help them correct any problems. If they don’t do it properly, this drill is a waste of time.

Tip #3 – Make sure your players do NOT dip one shoulder or lean too far forward. When shooting, you want your players to have an erect torso. I like to use the phrase “shoot tall.”

Tip #4 – If you as a coach, don’t know all the aspects of proper shooting form, consider picking up a good shooting video. We covered the basics above but there are more things to look for, like hand placement on the ball and so on.

5 Unique Form Shooting Drills

As you know, excessive upper torso twists and excessive fading during the shooting motion can damage your shooting percentage.

One of the keys to great shooting is…

The ability to transition to a stable, balanced position as quickly as possible! Your ability to reduce excessive twists and fading prior to shooting the ball results in a higher shooting percentage.

Coach Chris Oliver has a unique form shooting routine that is perfect for this. It improves your shooting through better balance and stability!

During practices and pre-game preparation, you will notice that players like Jimmy Butler and Dirk Nowitzki use many of the same drills.

Butler and Nowitzki are tremendously skilled at transitioning from unstable positions to a stable position at the end of their shooting motion. These drills are a big reason why!

These drills and exercises also improve your strength and power throughout your entire body or kinetic chain. This better strength, power, balance, and stability leads to… higher & quicker jumping, faster running, quicker changes of direction, better playing through contact, and so on!

 

Block Shooting Drills

Ray Allen Shooting Drill

The Ray Allen shooting drill is a great drill that you can use for a shooting warm up or to end the workout in a fun, competitive manner. It can easily be adapted for beginners and pros. Check out the instructions, diagrams, and video below for more details.

 

There are 5 lines. From each line, there are 5 spots. This is approximately the distance on each shot:
Spot 1 – 4 Feet
Spot 2 – 8 Feet
Spot 3 – 12 Feet
Spot 4 – 16 Feet
Spot 5 – 20 Feet

You have to make a shot from spot 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5 in 5 consecutive shots in order to advance to the next line.

If you miss from any of the spots, you start over in that line. If you miss a shot in line 3, you start over from line 3. You don’t go back to line 1.

Your goal is to finish all 5 lines in 2 minutes.

 

Wanted to give a special thanks to Kyle Wolf who is the shooter in the video below. Kyle is a 6’6 forward at Rockhurst High School (Class of 2013) in Kansas City, Missouri.

 

Regressions and Progressions To Make The Drill Easier or Harder Based on Skill Level:

  • Move back a spot after each make – Rather than making 5 shots in a row, you allow the players to move back a spot after each make even if they miss in between.
  • Use 3 or 4 Spots – Instead of using 5 spots, you can make it a little bit easier by only making them go to spot 3 or 4.
  • 6 Spots – For more advanced players, you can add an extra spot.
  • Kyle Korver Status – Make 25 shots in a row.

 

 

In summary, I hope you have enjoyed this drill and make sure to stay tuned for more informative drills. If you have any questions feel free to ask them in the comment section below, I will happily answer them. Also, if you have any things that you think should be added to this post I will try my best to improve on it;) Lastly add up the socials and receive updates on when I am dropping a post or something in the shop and generally anything about basketball.

 

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